Learn More





DNN Community Blog

The Community Blog is a personal opinion of community members and by no means the official standpoint of DNN Corp or DNN Platform. This is a place to express personal thoughts about DNNPlatform, the community and its ecosystem. Do you have useful information that you would like to share with the DNN Community in a featured article or blog? If so, please contact .

The use of the Community Blog is covered by our Community Blog Guidelines - please read before commenting or posting.

DotNetNuke Tips and Tricks #18: Just to Summarize

I have been using Windows Live Writer (WLW) for a few years now.  I really love WLW for writing my blog.  In fact I loved it so much that it was one of the reasons I had shifted my personal blog to  At the time, the DotNetNuke Blog module did not support a posting API which could be used with WLW.  You don’t know real pain until you have tried to write a blog post with nothing but a web based rich text editor.  Once you lose one or two posts because of a session timeout or your post gets mangled because of the way the editor handles script blocks or xml blocks, you will quickly swear off all blogging with an RTE.

Once I started using BlogEngine, I came to really appreciate some of its features.  It really tries to leverage the capabilities of WLW to make the blogging experience as pain free as possible.  One feature that I use quite a bit is the ability to split my blog into a summary along with the full post just by including the “[more]” tag in my post.  Everything before the tag will be used when displaying the blog summaries.  The entire content will be displayed when viewing a specific blog post.  This is great, although it does limit your ability to craft a great summary that differs from the opening of your blog post.

Unfortunately, the DotNetNuke Blog module does not support the “[more]” tag.  If you don’t provide a summary when creating a post for the Blog module, then it will try to create a summary using the first 1000 or so characters.  This rarely works with my blog posts and even when it works it is generally not optimal.  Because I usually include an image at the top of my posts, the auto-summary feature usually just chokes and I am forced to hand enter a summary for my blog on  This is definitely a problem.  My blog posts often include coding examples.  When I edit a blog post just so I can hand craft the summary, it also has the side effect of opening the main blog content in the RTE which then reformats my code blocks when I go to save the summary.  Hello mangled code samples.

Recently, while reviewing my Hacktaculous post, I re-opened it using the new WLW Beta.  Imagine my surprise when I was greeted with this image


Notice that this post includes both my summary as well as the full post and is separated by a dotted line with the word “More…”.  In looking at the source tab I see in the HTML that I have both a summary section and the full content section separated by <!—more—>.  This is awesome!

After playing around with this for a bit, I found that the DotNetNuke Blog fully supports this feature.  I can create my summary along with my full blog post all within WLW.  When posted to a DotNetNuke Blog, the summary and blog content are both posted correctly and I no longer have to hand edit my entry after posting to my company blog on  Now I can have real summaries which are not just the first couple of paragraphs of my blog post and I don’t have to worry about mangling my code examples. After a little further research I found that there is a “split post” button on the insert tab on the new ribbon bar.  This button inserts the magical <!—more—> comment tag into my post. 


I don’t know how long this feature has existed in WLW or how long it has been supported by DotNetNuke Blog.  For me it is brand new.  As a fairly prolific DotNetNuke blogger, I am betting that it is probably new for many others in the DotNetNuke community as well.


There are currently no comments, be the first to post one.

Comment Form

Only registered users may post comments.


2sic Daniel Mettler (125)
Aderson Oliveira (15)
Alec Whittington (11)
Alex Shirley (10)
Andrew Nurse (30)
Anthony Glenwright (5)
Antonio Chagoury (28)
Ash Prasad (22)
Ben Schmidt (1)
Benjamin Hermann (25)
Benoit Sarton (9)
Beth Firebaugh (12)
Bill Walker (36)
Bob Kruger (5)
Brian Dukes (2)
Brice Snow (1)
Bruce Chapman (20)
Bryan Andrews (1)
cathal connolly (55)
Charles Nurse (163)
Chris Hammond (203)
Chris Paterra (55)
Clinton Patterson (28)
Cuong Dang (21)
Daniel Bartholomew (2)
Dave Buckner (2)
David Poindexter (3)
David Rodriguez (2)
Doug Howell (11)
Erik van Ballegoij (30)
Ernst Peter Tamminga (74)
Geoff Barlow (6)
Gifford Watkins (3)
Gilles Le Pigocher (3)
Ian Robinson (7)
Israel Martinez (17)
Jan Blomquist (2)
Jan Jonas (3)
Jaspreet Bhatia (1)
Jenni Merrifield (6)
Joe Brinkman (270)
John Mitchell (1)
Jon Henning (14)
Jonathan Sheely (4)
Jordan Coopersmith (1)
Joseph Craig (2)
Kan Ma (1)
Keivan Beigi (3)
Ken Grierson (10)
Kevin Schreiner (6)
Leigh Pointer (31)
Lorraine Young (60)
Malik Khan (1)
Matthias Schlomann (15)
Mauricio Márquez (5)
Michael Doxsey (7)
Michael Tobisch (3)
Michael Washington (202)
Mike Horton (19)
Mitchel Sellers (28)
Nathan Rover (3)
Navin V Nagiah (14)
Néstor Sánchez (31)
Nik Kalyani (14)
Peter Donker (52)
Philip Beadle (135)
Philipp Becker (4)
Richard Dumas (22)
Robert J Collins (5)
Roger Selwyn (8)
Ruben Lopez (1)
Ryan Martinez (1)
Salar Golestanian (4)
Sanjay Mehrotra (9)
Scott McCulloch (1)
Scott S (11)
Scott Wilkinson (3)
Scott Willhite (97)
Sebastian Leupold (80)
Shaun Walker (237)
Shawn Mehaffie (17)
Stefan Cullmann (12)
Stefan Kamphuis (12)
Steve Fabian (31)
Timo Breumelhof (24)
Tony Henrich (3)
Torsten Weggen (2)
Vicenç Masanas (27)
Vincent Nguyen (3)
Vitaly Kozadayev (6)
Will Morgenweck (37)
Will Strohl (163)
William Severance (5)
Try Evoq
For Free
Start Free Trial
a Demo
See Evoq Live
Need More Information?